Pokémon & Animal Menageries (Miranda)

http://quantumbuild.net/stunning-windows/ Pokémon Go is all about collecting wild animals: you roam the countryside trapping defenceless creatures inside tiny balls before bragging to your friends about how many you have.

http://sandsfoot.com/domains/grassonthepitch.com Historically, these collections of exotic animals, known as menageries, were generally connected to a royal court. For example, the Tower of London housed a royal menagerie for six centuries, housing lions, elephants, leopards and, famously, a polar bear that would be regularly led out of the Tower to catch food and wash itself in the Thames.

You can see a state of the Polar Bear at the Tower of London today and his ghosted is the most sighted...

http://antiquewarehousemall.com/wp-json/oembed/1.0/embed?url=http://antiquewarehousemall.com/2013/02/old-scale/ You can see a statue of the Polar Bear at the Tower of London today and his/her ghost is the most sighted. Maybe think twice about packing Tuna sandwiches on your visit to the crown jewels…

These menageries served as a symbol of the wealth and power of the Crown, but were also used for entertainment. Louis XIV used his menageries to entertain courtiers and visiting dignitaries with bloody battles: in 1682 the ambassador of Persia enjoyed the spectacle of a fight to the death between a royal tiger and an elephant. Next time you’re battling your Pokémon at a gym, you should think of Louis XIV!

Read More:

  • BENNETT, E. T. (1829). The Tower menagerie: comprising the natural history of the animals contained in that establishment; with anecdotes of their characters and history. London, Printed for R. Jennings.
  • GRIGSON, C. (2016). Menagerie: the history of exotic animals in England 1100-1837.
  • HAHN, D. (2004). The Tower menagerie: the amazing 600-year history of the royal collection of wild and ferocious beasts kept at the Tower of London. New York, Jeremy P. Tarcher/Penguin.
  • ROBBINS, L. E. (2002). Elephant slaves and pampered parrots: exotic animals in eighteenth-century Paris. Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press.